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is a live look at tahrir square. group of hard-core demonstrators vowing to stay until until mohammed morsi invokes a decree granting himself absolute power. this is how bad the violence got. thousands clashing with police and morsi supporters and new pressure on the president to back down and fear that violence will flare up. steve? >> reporter: the number of those tents put up by protestors has grown. they are intent to stay there throughout the week but the number of protestors on the street has declined dramatically over the last 24 hours. on late friday there were up to 40,000 people on the square. the protests did turn violent here in cairo and other cities. buildings torched. police cars torched. a lot of tear gas and pepper spray in the shutdowns between protestors and security forces. and morsi and the top justices. many chief justices here in cairo and across the country they will no longer to go work until the president repeals his decrease for a power grab. we're seen what could be a show down on the streets. that is when supporters on tuesday and saying that he is trying to be
with the lathes decree from hamid morsi. morsi giving himself almost ax slut power dosuspending judicia review of any decision he makes bringing instability to the fragile middle east. welcome to america's news headquarters. >> it's a move threatening to plunge egypt into the kind of turmoil not seen since the fall of former egyptian leader mubarek. protestors saying morsi has declared himself the new faro and they are calling for a change in egypt's ruling regime. steve hair again is live from kie rope. >> the number of protestors building once again behind me. the number of several,000. we have seen squirm michiganis through out t-- skirmishes toda. it has been a cat and mouse game through out the day with police charging and retreating to come back a short time later. they are using large concrete blocks to build walls and protecting government buildings as well. two things to keep an eye on. they say they will not go back to work until the president repeals his decree a decree that puts him beyond the reach of the court so it could shut down prosecutions across the country. the egyptian st
president morsi granted himself unchecked powers and sent thousands of protesters back into the streets, people who had been helping to topple mubarak, now against the man they call the new egypt egyptian pharaoh. what are the chances we're headed for a new islamist coo in egypt? >> it could be headed that way. you could also be headed back to a military takeover. if things went in the wrong direction. you could also see a scenario where there's continued chaos. i'll never forget after i was in egypt, i met with the young people who made the revolution in the square. a young woman said it's not the first election we worry about, it's the second. that's what we have to worry about, a repeat of the iranian experience. what should the united states of america do? saying this unacceptable. we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is fragile but this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president
in egypt after negotiations break down between president morsi and judicial officials and people are are taking to the streets. >>> lawmakers back to work in the u.s. priority number one, avoiding the fiscal cliff. the left and right are talking compromi compromise. and the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, headed to c p capitol hill to meet with her most outspoken critics, answer questions about what happened in benghazi. benghazi. let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good evening. "outfront" tonight, egypt on edge. is a new dictatorship on the horizon? tonight, president morsi clarified, but really largely stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping powers. including freedom from judicial review for what he's calling presidential decisions. the announcement was made today after morsi met with members of egypt's judicial body, which has been very critical of his position and u.s. officials who were praising the new leader for his role in negotiating a cease fire between israel and hamas, well now when he took all these powers away from judge
it in the fascinating relationship between president obama and mohammed morsi. two mag ma tist pragmatists trya way to mediate this. you see it in the backdrop of surprising riots in jordan which will cause increasing problems, you have that changing environment which you know far more about. but the arab street needs something different. these governments now need to be more responsive to their people so that is an opening for a different relationship. and the president, no american president is going to criticize israel's launching of this war. but this is an opening for a relationship with egypt, with turkey, to implement a cease-fire that will monitor arms smuggling into gaza. that will monitor israel's relationship. overarching all of it, such a painful issue to discuss. overarching -- all of it is a history. going back at least to '67. of the united states' role, maybe, the united states' role as the enabler. as the political diplomatic economic military enabler of an israeli policy. in many ways, a younger generation is seeing israelis, that is not in the long-term benefit of the security of
" tonight, egypt on edge. is a new dictatorship on the horizon? tonight, president morsi clarified, but really largely stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping powers. including freedom from judicial review for what he's calling presidential decisions. the announcement was made today after morsi met with members of egypt's judicial body, which has been very critical of his decision. and u.s. officials who just days ago were heaping praise on the new egyptian leader for his role in initiating a cease-fire between israel and hamas, well, now when he took all these powers away from judges that reign supreme, they're in a tough spot. >> we have some concerns about the decisions and declarations announced on november 22nd. democracy depends on strong institutions and the important checks and balances that provide accountability. >> so, today, there were nationwide protests continuing in egypt and a million person march of anti morsi protesters is scheduled for tomorrow in tahrir square. the very spot where the revolution that cleared the way for morsi's presidency was born. now,
: fresh protests in egypt, as angry demonstrators clash with police for a third day, after president morsi claims that new rules all but exempt him from balances. the egyptian stock market falls amid fears of balance. i'm shannon bream, live in washington. america's news headquarters begins with the latest from cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who support president morsi and think he is doing what needs to be done. and those who think he is making a power
's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten
mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in june. in recent days, he'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. however, i must put myself on a clear path that will lead to the achievement of a clear goal. >> brown: the president's backers insisted the decree would be in effect only until a new constitution is approved. >> ( translated ): yes, he might be a dictator f
and morsi. two pragmatists trying to find a way to mediate this immediate conflict. you see it against the backdrop of an islamist backdrop of turkey and the riots in jordan that will cause increasing problems. you have that changing environment which you know more about. the arabs need something different. the governments need to be more responsive to their people. it's an opening for a different relationship. no american president is going to criticize, i would argue, israel's launching of this war. it is an opening for our relationship with egypt, turkey, to implement a cease-fire to monitor gaza and israel's relationship, but overarching all of it, it's a painful issue to discuss. anything we say on this show is going to be criticized. >> you think? >> i think. it's a history. going back to at least '67, the united states role as the enabler, as the political diplomatic economic enabler that in many ways, in a younger generation is seeing israelis that is not in the long term benefit of the security of the country. i make one last point. i urge your viewers to try to watch an israe
override any decision that has been made by morsi and that will be made by morsi. in a way, he is trying to create an imperial rpresidency, an imperial presidency that basically anoints morsi as the supreme lead over egypt, period. he monstrously miscalculated. he has thrown egypt into a political and constitutional crisis. he has finally succeeded in unifying the fractured opposition. now not just the liberals and the nationalists and the leftists. millions of egyptians are outraged in morsi addressing his own office of absolute authority. >> that's the question i have though. this has sparked massive protests as we can see. he is now -- you know, he's standing his ground but he also seems to be giving a little ground. is there cause in your view, maybe from our viewpoint, western standpoint, to take a step back and let this play out a little bit before cle clairing egypt's great democracy is over. is there a chance that by the owned the day there will be a resolution and could maybe strengthen democracy? >> i have no doubt in my mind that this is an egyptian crisis. egyptians must take
erupting in egypt after president muhammad morsi grants himself new and far-reaching powers. live pictures as the president speaking right now. that's muhammad morsi, as hundreds of egyptians are protesting in tahrir square today. morsi's opponents clashing with supporters in cities all over egypt. we're now hearing protesters storming the office of the muslim brotherhood and throwing out books and chairs and other things onto the streets. steve harrigan streaming live from cairo with the latest. hi, steve. >> reporter: gregg, behind me we're seeing the start of violence at this major demonstration in cairo. you see crowds off to my right, the tens of thousands who have gathered here beginning to run. we've seen tear gas fired as well as molotov cocktails. this big crowd here today, the biggest we've seen in some time, is really in reaction to what the new egyptian president did yesterday, muhammad morsi issuing some stunning information, first, that any decree he issues will be legal and that any declaration he issues is final and cannot be appealed by anyone, including the courts. the ne
. >>> and egypt's president mohamed morsi met with top judges this morning. this as violent protests rage in the streets for a third day. is a compromise in the works to solve the political crisis? we have a live report coming up from cairo. >>> and online shopping records are expected to be broken this cyber monday. did you hear this? for the first time some consumers will feel the sting of the ee tax. which states and retails are now taxing online shoppers for the very first time. >>> and join our conversation at twitter. you can find us @tamron hall and @news nation. [ "odd couple" theme plays ] humans -- even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> welcome back. we're following developing news. the one-time prime minister and general abruptly quit this morning. he's known as a leading strategist
to president morsi. what's more disturbing i think in many ways that hamas got credibility, they didn't deserve as a result of all of this, and i believe morsi was elevated by the white house and by secretary clinton, and i think the end result is that the only reason there's a cease-fire is because their missiles weren't effective, because the israelis were able to prevent they mean. them. i'm afraid they'll go back to the drug board and get bigger missiles that are more effective. what do you think? >> you're right. if you look at the wording of the cease-fire, it's pretty ridiculous. you've got the muslim brotherhood president as the arbiter of the israelis and hamas. don't forget the muslim brotherhood and hamas are the same organization. secondly, you have an administration, at least 2,000 people in the streets of cairo, saying we do not support this power grab. you've got the muslim brotherhood president who clearly does not believe in or support anything that has to do with american interests. the white house is essentially been silent on it. you know, it really reminds me of their silen
is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
: president mohamed morsi, gave himself almost unchecked powers and sent thousands into the streets, the people who have been helping to topple hosni mubarak, now, who they are calling the new egyptian pharaoh. are we headed for a you new islamist coup and islamist state in egypt. >> it could be headed that way and also could be headed back to a military takeover, if things went in the wrong direction. you could also see a scenario where there is continued chaos. i'll never forget, chris, after i was in egypt, i met with the young people who made the revolution in the square, and, a young woman said, senator mccain it's not the first election we worry about, it's the second. that is what we have to worry about, a repeat of the iranian experience in the 1970s, and -- but, what should the u.s. be doing, saying, this is unacceptable and thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is, by the way, incredibly fragile but is not what is acceptable, what the american taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy, which you p
from president morsi, but he -- and she was able to give him credit for that, which i think was very important along with prime minister netanyahu. and i think it actually made the difference between having a cease-fire, even though it is tenuous to be the groundwork for future talks. >> you know, congresswoman, so it did make the difference but then why is it that you think senators john mccain and lindsey graham cannot seem to give the president even the smallest bit of credit when, you know, this is his foreign policy, this is what he talked about in terms of diplomacy over sabre rattling, and it's working? >> unfortunately, senator mccain and senator graham remind me of the kids on the playground and they need to be put in time-out. what we know is that it was important, actually, for the president and for secretary clinton to are the space they needed without all the commentary from u.s. elected officials to conduct what was a really important and catalytic diplomatic moment. >> you know, talking about having the space to actually do their jobs, republicans have been hammering t
brotherhood encourages protests. anti-morsi protesters taking over tahrir square. >> dave: and shredder, and police files used as confetti at the macy's day parade. how can it happen? is our security now at risk? >> illinois has the worst budget deficit in the nation and why is the state spending millions of taxpayer dollars on table for prisoners. >> and eco friendly zip lines, maybe they want them to watch "fox & friends" in prison, have you ever thought of that. >> dave: amen, there's some viewers, baby. >> clayton: "fox & friends" begins right now. ♪ . >> alisyn:. >> alisyn: good morning, everybody, thanks for joining us bright and early on this sunday morning, we have quite a show for you, including the ongoing debate that dave briggs launched yesterday about yoga pants and we invite you to weigh in this morning. >> clayton: you're still leading this fight and championing this fight. >> alisyn: he's made it a platform. >> dave: i may run for the white house based on yoga pants. there's both good and bad and we will delve into this later on and look, common ground. it's unlike pol
of egypt's muslim brotherhood. the party of egyptian president mohammed morsi as he agrees to new talks about over his controversial decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. steve harrigan is streaming live from care row. what can you tell us. >> details of the offices of the muslim brotherhood. attack happened about 70 miles outside of cairo. one of the regional offices. one person killed in the attack, 60 wounded. here in cairo security forces skirmishes continues you can hear sirens and ambulances as well as tear gas is popped off as several thousand protestors are demonstrating to show their unhappiness. >> gregg: will morsi plan on meeting the judges tomorrow and what will they be talking about? >> as you know the judges across the country have threatened to go out on strike over this power grab by the egyptian president. there has been a meeting scheduled for tomorrow between morrisi and the judges no word of a cancellation. it could be an attempt by the egyptian president to reach out to opponents trying to draw black from the violence that has escalated. what we are waitin
our audience up to date on that. >>> coming up, egypt's president morsi not giving in despite another day of protests over the decree that giving him near absolute power. >>> but first, a lot going on today and here's things to know. president obama's second inauguration will have an asterisk next to it. it will be the seventh time ever that the constitutionally mandated date for a president's swearing in, january 20th, has fallen on a sunday. so, following tradition, the inauguration will be moved to monday, january 21st. house speaker boehner announced who will chair the 19 major house committees in the next congress and it turns out they have something in common besides party affiliation. they're all men, white men. but there are two committee charls that have not been filled yet so a woman could possibly end up in one of those seats. >>> meantime, some republican house members will attend a special screening of "lincoln" happening tomorrow. house majority whip mccarthy rented a theater for the event. president obama hosted a screening at the white house. those are the things we th
with their new president, mohamed morsi who said last week that his decisions cannot be challenged by the courts which gives him almost absolute power. and our holly williams is above tahrir square in cairo this evening. holly, what's going on in the crowd behind you now? >> reporter: scott, we are seeing scenes reminisce september of the egyptian revolution. tahrir square was once again carpeted in people today, tens of thousands of people who poured in from every direction and they were chanting the same slogan that they chanted during the revolution. the people want the downfall of the regime. i was out on this square earlier today talking to people. some people are saying that they won't leave the streets until president morsi rescinds the decrees that have given him sweeping new powers. we've seen very low-level violence here in cairo, but in several other cities there have been violent confrontations between president morsi's supporters and his opponents. >> pelley: is there any indication that all of this public demonstration is moving morsi to rescind his decree? >> reporter: well, if pr
. mohamed morsi under fire for granting himself extraordinary powers. will that affect cease-fire talks between israel and hamas? they're happening in egypt today. >> and $59 billion! retail records broken as americans crowded stores for some competitive shopping over the weekend. and now cyber monday is here. will shoppers be in even more of a spending mood? >> you want to talk about money? a new powerball jackpot. a new record in the cash payout. it's unreal. >> a packed two hours ahead for you this morning. new jersey congressman bill pascrell will be joining us, grover norquist, jamie rubin, dr. hanan ashrawi, will be our guest, peter billingsley from a christmas story, and grinle college hoops star jack taylor. remember him? big game he had the other day. and the one and only tony bennett, monday, november 26th. welcome, everybody, "starting point" this morning. is that a hint of compromise in the air on capitol hill? 35 days left till we reach the fiscal cliff. and a couple of key republicans are now suggesting that they're willing to forego their no tax pledge to try to get a bud
mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement. certainly within israel and the political circles that i've been speaking to, at least. it's something that mr. barak says that he wants to do for a long time but the recent operation by israeli forces in gaza delayed his announcement to do that. something he says he's been planning to do for a long time. this is a figure, as you mention, who's been in public office and public service for his entire
in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close election and the other choice may have been a more democratic choice. people were searching for new leadership and they ended up with this muslim brotherhood path mohamed morsi. what are the charges he's interested in compromise? >> reporter: he has shown no signs of making a concession. the opposition says they will stay put in tahrir square. they say they won't negotiate until the president makes a complete stepdown.
in the growing outrage over the president morsi's takeover. last week, the president from the muslim brotherhood issued several decrees including an order that every decision he makes is a final decision, no review. critics say he appointed himself as a dictator two years after a massive popular uprising ousted mubarak. our eyes and ears on the ground, these are the latest crowds you have seen in tahrir square, right, steve? >> the five days since the decree we wondered if the protests would get bigger or smaller. they are growing larger and more angry. the crowd today well over 100,000 people in tahrir square, and from different walks of life, different political stories. the opposition to the president has been unified by his decree expanding his own power. so we have people on want the old days of mubarak. you have liberals. nationalists. they are all angry at an overstepping by this president and they all coming out to the square. this is the way they are trying to use their leverage against the president. the chant are the same "this regime must leave." >>shepard: disturbing to hear your re
the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judiciary by banning anyone -- any authority, even the judiciary, from questioning, appealing any decisions he made since june. the question was going into this meeting, would he scale back on some of those d
to the government in egypt, the president mohamed morsi, that they would stop firing into israel. if that were to be revoked, that would be a violation. they would be breaking their word to the egyptians and that would cause some serious repercussions i assume, christiane, between the egypt government, muslim brotherhood-led government, and hamas. >> reporter: well, i was obviously talking about what's the perspective from this side was. but of course israel's demand was that there would be no more rockets and no more of that fire going into israel. that was something they really wanted. and of course israel does not want to see hamas resupplied through the tunnel network. that is still to be worked out. i asked him whether or not he got weapons and whether hamas was getting weapons from iran, and he gave me a non-confirmation confirmation. it's an open secret that they come through those tunnels. so that has to be taken in hand. we're not sure how that's going to happen, but obviously there is some egyptian role in that as well. but, yes, egypt is the guarantor of this cease-fire. neither sid
. the sixth straight day of protest after morsi issued his decree last thursday. earlier today, the protest turning violent on a street near tahrir square. at least three protesters have been killed since the weekend. nbc live from cairo. and the crowd in tahrir square has been growing, building over the past hours. explain what we're seeing now. >> reporter: well, behind me, probably tens of thousands of egyptians have gathered, been here since the early hours of the morning. in fact, some have been camped out for the past six days. many songs, chants, slogans reminiscent of two years ago, calling on the same things they did two years ago, which is for the president of egypt to step down. they've changed the name, obviously, to reflect egypt's new islamist president. you mentioned that incident today with the tear gas and the police, that took place outside the u.s. embassy. riot police there fired tear gas and rubber bullets to try to keep the crowds at bay. one of the central issues of the protesters behind me is that since the end of the revolution, egypt's police force has not been ref
? the president mohammed morsi knows that this is happening? >> i will put it this way. the weaponry goes to the red sea from iran. they also come from libya and at certain points, they all cost to egyptian territory. certainly, there is a responsibility to step up to the plate and stop the smuggling. egypt has been constructed from the past. we hope they will continue to fulfill this role now in the future. jenna: i ask that question because we know how important this relationship is for your country and all of ours. i want to talk about "the new york times" article that he wrote about today. it was published and he said that hamas is not interested in peace. they want violence and they want to promote terror. it is not a rational thing according to the way that you laid this out. why negotiate at all through any here in this region? >> they don't want to negotiate at all, they don't want to speak with us. they want to destroy us. they don't actually want to just kill israelis, but jews throughout the world. they are a genocide organization. but they can negotiate with egypt and others w
against morsi escalating reports tonight of one person killed and another injured on attacks on muslim brotherhood north of cairo and the muslim brotherhood morsi's political party and angered many opposition activist was a power grab, and giving himself near absolute control of egypt. steve harrigan is streaming live for us from cairo. he understands you're in tahrir square? >> reporter: harris, that square behind me, as you can see from our live pictures, more tents have sprung up as the evening has gone on and those protesters say they are there to say we're hearing some small explosions and tear gas after three nights of protests here, skirmishes, and at least 500 people injured in those protests and now a death tonight as well. this coming north of cairo when an office of the muslim brotherhood, the group that supports the president was attacked, one 15-year-old boy killed in that attack, as many as 16 people wounded, harris. >> harris: it looks much different than last night. much more active at this hour. tell me this, i know that mohammed morsi is planning to meet tomorrow with
air force one and speaking to mohammed morsi who received high marks for his constructive role in the cease-fire, although a critic offered this praise. >> i think actually it may be president obama who gets more credit here. i think he pressured both egyptian president morsi and prime minister netanyahu to come to this deal, because i think he was afraid that the conflict would expand. >> today, morsi granted himself far reaching powers, placing all of his decisions, past and present above judicial oversight and protecting the islamic dominate panel of the constitution. although morsi is a member of the brotherhood, padilla is denouncing peace offerings, and says that jihad is mandatory for muslims and calling on them, quote to back your brothers in palestine. a former push administration official says that mr. obama must be helpful and attentive to the middle east, but that only goes so far. . >> he can't infuluence parties that do not seek agreements between themselves because the agreement is only as good as the parties themselves. and if one feels they have the upper hand
of strength from the opposition that spent days blasting egypt he is new president, morsi. he upset just about everybody last week when he decided to give himself broad new powers that say his decisions don't need approval from any court. essentially he's above the law. really no different than a dictator. protests showed their across the country, some of them violent. street fighting this between demonstrators and police. president morsi tried to calm the criticism by promising to reserve his new powers for only the most important decisions. but that didn't appease the protesters. remember, just last week, the united states was publicly praising president morsi when he helped end the conflict between israel and gaza. the white house says president obama has not spoken to his egyptian counterpart since then and today the press secretary jay carney said basically the egyptians need to work this out themselves. there is no evidence that will happen any time soon. right now this enormously influential nation where people forced out of dictator last year again threatens to fall into chaos and inst
thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease fire which is incredibly fragile but this is not acceptable and the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress toward demaddress which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> brian: joining us is the navy commander from the office of secretary of defense under george bush. he is jd gordon. is it up to the president to get more involved to tell morsi to stop with the absolute monarch thing. >> i think the president should stand up to the muslim brotherhood and say we will not send aid dollars to egypt. morsi put himself [pwao-fr] the courts and law. it is one dick traitorship replaced by another. we need to get tough on egypt. >> steve: when the arab spring first started people were optmistic and it is not turning out the way we hoped it would. >> no, in 2010 the survey poll in egypt found that 17 percent of the egyptians were favorable to the united states and 24 percent favorable to al-qaida and 60 percent to the isla
morsi. it is less than 24 hours old. there is deep mistrust. civilians on both sides hoping the agreement will bring a permanent end to the deadly air strikes and rocket fire. in gaza with the i have latest, eamon, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. for the first time in nine days the people of gaza were able to go about their business as usual in a place that usually is not very normal. so, for the first time they were able to wake up today after cease-fire declared last evening and shops and stores reopened people going back to their homes. throughout this conflict 9,000 or so palestinians were displaced from their homes. they took up shelters in u.n. schools. today for the first time able to go back, survey damage in some of the areas and try to get their lives back to normal. in gaza city, tens of thousands of supporters of hamas and other palestinian factions that have been fighting over the past nine days came out to the streets in what is described as a victory rally. the leaders of hamas came out thanked the palestinian people for the steadfast support. they ce
criticism continues to pour in against a power grab by egyptian president mohamed morsi threatening to derail the country's post revolutionary progress. four straight nights of protests and security officials say one teenager was killed and 40 others hurt when the demonstrations turned violent sunday. the protests began after morsi expanded power including preventing courts from revoking his decisions. joining me new is michael sink. protesters calling him a dictator, no better than ho mubarak. >> this is the ate latest in a series of moves he engaged in. in august he sidelined egypt's military council and took their powers for himself, the legislative and constitutional assembly powers they had and the only check remaining on his power after that time was the judiciary and now he swept aside that check. he has consolidated all power for thims and asked the people to trust him and guide egypt through this transitional period. >> protesters want him to step down. what do you see happening here? >> looks like neither side is prepared to back down. you're right. they're not prepared to
is a plus. gregg: are you surprised at how helpful the new islamist government of muhammad morsi really was in this process as a mediator standing up for the truce, probably pressuring hamas and, of course, their benefactor? are you surprised at what they did? yeah. i think it's a pleasant surprise. i mean, this is not the government we would have wanted in egypt post-mubarak because they are muslim brotherhood, and there's parts of the muslim brotherhood that is totally alien to us, the salafist movement which are radical islamists, but here he is openly sporting hamas, but at the same time brokering a deal. part of the motivation is the relationship with the united states, the aid that he receives from us on a regular basis -- gregg: 3.5 billion a year -- 1.5 billion a year. >> and i think a lot the criticism will be sub sued. gregg: money often talks in that part of the world. egypt claims it has intercepted and stopped truckloads of missile warheads headed for gaza. is that a single sl jewish tear gesture or the real deal? >> they probably have, but this is the toughest part of the
senators are threatening to with hold that. is that our leverage? >> morsi stepped up to the plate to fulfill the role of a peacemaker. for many observing this, that's a welcome geopolitical event but it's also a surprise. but let's not kid ourselves. morsi's motivations are as you suggest. we provide him billions in aid. he needs that money. he wants a relationship with the united states. at the same time he has an audience in egypt that clearly is backing hamas in this event and is anti-israel and he has to cater to both. gregg: general jack keane, great to see you. heather: an amazing athletic performance smashing a 58-year-old ncaa basketball touring record. jack taylor scoring 138 points. his home team scored 179 points. jack taylor join us live to talk a little bit more about this amazing feat. jack, i have got to ask you, how in the world did you do this? >> coming into the game i hadn't been shooting well so far this season. so my teammates and coaches wanted to get me going offensively. they made a concerted effort to give me more shots. >> you kind of had an off weekend a
clinton can pressure hamas and can be persuaded by mohamed morsi her chances are pretty good. if she cannot, then i think this will be another round of fighting, potentially even a ground war. i don't think israel wants a ground war. i don't think hamas would mind a ground war. a much more bloody -- would get involved. not the egyptian government, the egyptian people would start streaming in here. the arab media that was so influential in bringing down a arab dictatorships here would go into a state of -- that would benefit hamas. so i think it really depends on how much influence hillary clinton can have over morsi and how much influence morsi can have because even though this area here is being pounded militarily and there was the heaviest air strikes tonight that we have seen thus far, hamas feels -- >> richard engel, live from gaza. thank you. thank you for staying up in the middle of the night. stay safe. >>> thinking about the leverage here that the american government has, we all judge our diplomacy of our own government based on what outcome they are able to achieve, but in a
is morsi. let's begin with you. what is happening or not happening now? >> reporter: it's such a difference to what we were going through just 24 hours ago when the streets were completely deserted. we were seeing out going rockets and feeling many more incoming rounds. right now the streets are bustling with activity. people out and about. we did see those celebrations beginning very shortly after the cease-fire was announced. there was another gathering at midday today. people calling this a victory on the one hand for hamas. others really out just for the pure simple fact that now they can go out without fear of being caught up in the violence. many are under no illusion this is a long lasting solution. >> do people in gau sau feel like israel will honor the agreement and that this truce will hold. >> reporter: there's no trust between their history. something of a test period to s see. it's currently negotiated in egypt right now with egypt continuing. the next phase is going to be whether or not the various restrictions on movements across the border. the israelis have said they will c
're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon:. i'm jon scott. the first elected leader, president mohammed morsi expected to come face-to-face with senior judges in egypt who say his power grab has gone too far. there are indications that the both side are trying to find some middle ground. morsi's maneuver unleased a rage of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's side that compromise may be in the offing. perhaps a scaling down of that presidential decree which basicall
's president morsi's new sweeping powers that he is seeking. we'll get a live report. plus, the former head of florida's republican party, he's making a stunning claim about the state's early voting law saying it was deliberately designed to suppress minority votes. it's just one of the things we thought you should know. join our conversation on twitter. you can find us at @tamronhall and at @newsnation. a winter wonderland doesn't just happen. it takes some doing. some coordinating. and a trip to the one place with the new ideas that help us pull it all together. from the things that hang and shine... ...to the things that sparkle and jingle. all while saving the things that go in our wallet. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. get fresh cut savings. live trees are arriving weekly. now's a good time to think about your options. are you looking for a plan that really meets your needs? and your budget? as you probably know, medicare only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, in
opposition rally against president morsi there. escalating violence is spreading across the city and much of egypt really for the last five days ever since the president's controversial decree granting himself nearance sew lieutenant power. that is a move many critics say is veiled attempt to turn egypt back into dictatorship. others say morsi is attempting to clean out the old guard and reaffirm a brand new move to a new government in egypt. something we're watching closely in the middle east. with pressure growing last night, morsi sat down last night with a five-hour meeting with the country's senior judges in an attempt he says to diffuse the situation but refused calls to withdraw the decree. >>> there is new push on capitol hill to stop the environmental protection agency from moving forward with a plan to impose stricter oil and gas regulations which opponents say will only cause more pain at the pump and drive a gal ghoul lon of regular -- gallon of regular gasoline higher than what you see on the screen. peter barnes is with us with more on this. this isn't just about gas prices.
in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed morsi, it is a big test for the new leader. steve harrigan is live in cairo. some are saying that mohammed morsi is the real winner here. you have all sides facing the same person. americans giving him high marks for his mediation, even some israeli officials praising the president. as far as the mediation goes, there were some concerns about which direction he would say, a long-term member of the muslim brotherhood and a public sympathizer of hamas. and in the end, he worked closely with u.s. officials about that days of violence. he had all those conversations with president obama. >> we are wondering. he is trying to change the constitution and give themselves more power. what can you tell us about that? >> some dramatic developments which have just occurred in the last hours, and we have had four days of protests. they could be extremely large tomorrow. what the egyptian president has done is basically said that no one can overrule any of his decrees since he became president in june. not even the courts. he also said any of those guilty
article, "new york times," egypt tumult, a rift emerges in morsi's team. morsi, who is part of the muslim brotherhood, they say hey, you know what? we're not going to be involved in the process. we're just going to sit back here. we're going to read our koran. and we're just going to sit back. suddenly they decide we're going to be involved in the process, which is all right. and then we see this weekend, morsi is seizing power that he doesn't have. egypt's about to get really ugly again. >> you know, i think that you see the pushback in the streets. morsi's not going to be able to get away with everything that he wants to get away with. they've turned a corner. >> what's his justification for seizing all of this power illegally? >> hubris. the guy -- he had just helped broker a deal in gaza, and he felt that he had some running room with the americans because he, you know, had essentially done our bidding. >> he's got the president of the united states calling him, the american secretary of state. >> that kind of goes to your head. >> yeah. i'm a big guy. >> you know, you live half your
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